Bronze Age Military Equipment

B1795

This book looks closely at the development of tactics, weapons and armour of the Bronze Age that have been largely overlooked because of the frequent assumption that the Iron Age created the basis of later warfare. Central to the review is the examination of replica arms and armour that have recreated full-scale examples of military equipment that is largely recognized from drawings and sculpture.

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NAME: Bronze Age Military Equipment
CLASSIFICATION: Book Reviews
FILE: R1795
DATE: 18122
AUTHOR: Dan Howard
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 169
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Weapons, armour, chariots, Aegean, Near East, Middle East, replicas, khopesh, scale armour, helmet, shield,
ISBN: 1-84884-293-7
IMAGE: B1795.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ce8kbu4
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The Bronze Age saw the development of metal weapons and of large civilizations that could assemble significant armies and undertake set piece battles on a large scale. It also saw the use of horses and chariots in battle and laid the foundations that were followed into the Iron Age and to modern times. It required the accumulation of wealth and surpluses that required rulers and administrations.
The Sumerians introduced massed infantry in the 26th Century BC and in the period that followed to the collapse of the chariot civilizations in the 12th Century BC, all of the crucial developments in military weaponry took place that were to continue through to the development of the gun from the 13th Century AD. Even after the development of the gun, and the more recent developments of the 20th Century AD, the basic concepts of warfare developed from Sumerian times have continued to apply.
This book looks closely at the development of tactics, weapons and armour of the Bronze Age that have been largely overlooked because of the frequent assumption that the Iron Age created the basis of later warfare. Central to the review is the examination of replica arms and armour that have recreated full-scale examples of military equipment that is largely recognized from drawings and sculpture.
Tests of replica arms and armour may not always produce robust data for a number of reasons, as the author explains, but they do provide a basis for analysis that was previously not available. They also provide a view that fully demonstrates the use of bronze and which is never disclosed fully by drawings and sculptures in stone. Bronze weapons, shields and body armour were much more sophisticated than many may expect and it can be seen that early iron weapons and armour followed similar patterns. Iron permitted a greater sophistication in the creation of alloys and the methods of forging and welding that allowed iron and steel weapons to provide greater strength and resilience in use, but those developments did not radically alter the basis shapes and designs. For example, the steel sabre and the bronze Egyptian khopesh share a purpose in drawing the target into the blade in a chopping or drawing action, where a straight sword blade is optimised for stabbing thrusts, although sabre and khopesh probably evolved originally from the axe, which was optimised for chopping
The author has provided an able and readable review that is supported in the text by drawings and sketches, but there is also an excellent full colour photographic section that shows replica weapons and armour created in bronze.

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